Tuesday Hymns: “Jesus, with Thy Church Abide”

Because of family issues, Dixie and I have been alternating going to church for a while, but Sunday we were able to attend together. When we got into the car to head for home, I turned to her and said, “Did you notice the words to the offertory hymn?” and she responded with, “Yes, I was about to mention that. They were really good.” It was a hymn that I was not very familiar with; thus “Jesus, with Thy Church Abide” becomes our Tuesday Hymn for this week. Thomas Benson Pollock (1839-1896) was an Anglican pastor from Ireland who spent much of his life ministering to the poor at St. Alban’s Mis­sion in Birm­ing­ham (plus, he had a great beard). This hymn is a prayer to the Lord to use His church to minister in a fallen world.

John H. Gower’s tune may be a bit pedestrian, but frankly, so is the Indelible Grace tune. The lyrics, however, make it a hymn worth singing, which we did at our evening service.

Jesus, with thy church abide,
Be her Saviour, Lord and Guide,
While on earth her faith is tried:
We beseech thee, hear us.

Keep her life and doctrine pure;
Grant her patience to endure,
Trusting in thy promise sure:
We beseech thee, hear us.

May she one in doctrine be,
One in truth and charity,
Winning all to faith in thee:
We beseech thee, hear us.

May she guide the poor and blind,
Seek the lost until she find,
And the brokenhearted bind:
We beseech thee, hear us.

Save her love from growing cold,
Make her watchmen strong and bold,
Fence her round, thy peaceful fold:
We beseech thee, hear us.

May her lamp of truth be bright,
Bid her bear aloft its light
Through the realms of heathen night:
We beseech thee, hear us.

Arm her soldiers with the cross,
Brave to suffer toil or loss,
Counting earthly gain but dross:
We beseech thee, hear us.

May she holy triumphs win,
Overthrow the hosts of sin,
Gather all the nations in:
We beseech thee, hear us.

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Happy birthday, Dixie!

 

 

Can you keep a secret? When I was a child I hated it when people would sing “Happy Birthday” to me; it always seemed so…awkward. I never grew out of it. But, there is enough of a libertarian side to me that if it makes people feel good, I just let them sing. It doesn’t hurt anything for me to feel…awkward. Dixie and I are different in many ways, but that is one trait that we share, so I have to be careful in writing this blog post. I don’t want her to feel…awkward, but I went to enough of those marriage conferences down through the years where the speakers said that it is a good thing to publicly praise your wife; so, here goes.

Tomorrow Dixie will be fifty-three years old (like me, Dixie doesn’t mind people knowing her age because she worked hard for all of those years). She entered my life when I was still going through the grieving process of losing a wife and daughter, so she learned very early about all “the fine print in the contract” as she adjusted to life around Clifton Rankin. The Russians only wished they had the intelligence network of a small southeast Texas town when the local pastor begins seeing someone (thankfully, this was during the time when there was no Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, Instagram, etc., but the telephone lines were a-humming). One dear lady even said, “Oh, I wished Dixie would have talked to me first.” (I’m not sure what warnings she had mind to pass along)

I was used to life in the fish bowl, but Dixie had to figure it out as she went along. She, however, was a trooper, and stayed the course. We had no choice but to be perfectly honest with one another to survive, and it paid off in great dividends down the road. Our twenty-seven years together have not always been easy, but she has always been there for me through “the good, the bad, and the ugly,” and I am grateful that she took the risk of taking on the mantle of “pastor’s wife.” So, at the risk of making her feel…awkward; I’ll simply say, “Happy birthday, Dixie! You are still the one who can make me laugh.”

Tuesday Hymns: “Teach Me, O Lord, Your Way of Truth”

Teach me o lord your way of truth

Ray Lanning, a pastor in the Christian Reformed Church, had this to say about The Psalter of 1912:

The year was 1912, and the place was Pittsburgh. In the heart of the city famous for steel and beer, a small group of Psalm-singing United Presbyterians held a last committee meeting. They sat to put the final touches on the labor of nearly twenty years, as they wrote a preface to a new metrical version of the Psalms with music. It was published that year, and has come to be known as The Psalter, 1912, or simply, The Psalter. This book of praise has been in use ever since in North America, and its influence has spread to many denominations and many other books of Psalms and hymns. It is likely no exaggeration to say that The Psalter, 1912 has been used longer and more widely than any other book like it in American church history.”

Our Tuesday Hymn for this week, “Teach Me, O Lord, Your Way of Truth,” comes to us from that Psalter. It is a metrical paraphrase of Psa. 119:33-40 and reminds us that not only is our justification by grace, but so is our sanctification. The Psalmist asks for the Lord to “teach us” His way of truth, to “give us” an understanding heart, to “make us” walk in His commandments, to “give us” a heart that loves to obey, to “turn our eyes” from vanity, to “cause us” to walk in His ways, to “turn away” our reproach and fear, and to “revive us” in His righteousness.

As we sang this hymn last Sunday morning, I thought back on how my preaching has changed over the years. It went from “come on guys, we can do this,” to “look at what Christ has done for us.” Our obedient Christian life is a result of the “love of Christ that compels us.” (2 Cor. 5:14) This Psalm is sung to the Joseph Holbrook’s tune, Bishop.

Teach me, O Lord, Your way of truth,
And from it I will not depart;
That I may steadfastly obey,
Give me an understanding heart.

In your commandments make me walk,
For in your law my joy shall be;
Give me a heart that loves your will,
From discontent and envy free.

Turn now my eyes from vanity,
And cause me in Your ways to tread;
O let Your servant prove Your Word
And thus to Godly fear be led.

Turn away my reproach and fear;
Your righteous judgments I confess;
To know Your precepts I desire;
Revive me in Your righteousness.

“Let the little children come to me…”

children-in-pew-300x199

Today at worship I sat in the next to the last row of our worship center, which meant that I was surrounded by young families on three sides. As a sixty-three year old my days of corralling a small child during a worship service are in my rear view mirror. Actually, they are in my wife’s rear view mirror, because as a pastor, I was always on the podium or in the pulpit during this time of struggle. She carries the battle scars of those difficult days, but I digress.

These young couples did a masterful job of working with their children. Yes, there was some noise. Yes, they had to go out with a child once (okay, maybe twice). But, they were doing something very important. They were teaching their children how very important worship is. Worship is so important that Mom and Dad don’t go to soccer games (or other places) on the Lord’s Day, but to church. Worship is so important that Mom and Dad pick up hymnals and sing songs of praise to God. Worship is so important that Mom and Dad confess their sins. Worship is so important that Mom and Dad pick up their Bibles and read along as God’s Word is read. Worship is so important that Mom and Dad put their tithe and offerings into the offering plate when it is passed. Worship is so important that Mom and Dad close their eyes and pray at the proper time (okay, maybe they peak to make sure no one escapes, but they work at it). Worship is so important that Mom and Dad are quiet and listen to the pastor open up God’s Word. Worship is so important that Mom and Dad do this Sunday after Sunday, month after month, year after year, and that lesson is not lost on a child no matter how small. It is a lesson that can never be learned in a children’s church or youth service. It can only be learned up close and personal by observing Mom and Dad on God’s day in God’s house.

Is it easy? No, but it is important. It is called parenting, and it is one of the most important things that we will ever do. So to all of those young families who are afraid that they are bothering the old guy with a gray beard and thinning, gray hair I say, “Thank you. Thank you for loving your children enough to accept the responsibility to teach them about the importance of gathering with God’s people and worshiping Him. And, by the way, I heard the sermon from 1 Peter about loving those around us with the overflow of God’s love, because of the foundation of God’s love, and the nature of God’s love. You didn’t bother me a bit. I heard every word.”

May the Lord bless the faithfulness of young parents!