On Being a Pastor Part 2

sick-pastor

This is a faithful saying: If a man desires the position of a bishop, he desires a good work.” (1 Timothy 3:1) The word translated “bishop” in this verse is a word in the Book of Acts that describes the church office of “pastor.” In my last post, I shared about some of the challenges that make the life of a pastor a difficult one. I wrote about people problems, task problems, emotional problems, and time problems, and because of this, pastors, whether Baptist or Presbyterian, can often be a rather whiney lot (there is also one Methodist pastor that I shared a funeral with in West Texas who moaned to me about how badly the Bishop was treating him, so my guess is this characteristic cuts across all denominations). All that being said, let me go on record after spending 35 years in the ministry that being a pastor in one of Christ’s churches is one of the greatest blessings that one can experience this side of heaven.

When one is a pastor he gets to make his living reading and studying the Word of God. Hours of every week (if a pastor is worth his salt) is spent in mining the treasures of God’s truth. He has the opportunity to dig into the languages of Scripture, to read the commentaries written by the servants of God of all the ages, and to seek to discover how to best communicate that truth to God’s people. Before a sermon is ever preached to God’s people, the pastor has preached it to himself again and again throughout the week.

When one is a pastor he has the opportunity to spend time planning the corporate worship of God’s people. He has the privilege of reading through many Psalms and hymns to discover which ones will help explain the text of Scripture that he will be preaching on that Sunday. “The Trinity Hymnal,” for example, consists of 742 hymns covering hundreds of years of Christian hymnody filled to the brim with Biblical truth. When one adds in “The Trinity Psalter” he also is blessed by the metrical versions of the Psalms that have spoken to God’s people for generations.

When one is a pastor he has the great privilege of baptizing new believers, and the children of believers, pointing people to the grace of Christ as their only hope in this life and the life to come. He has the privilege of breaking bread in front of the flock of God and speaking on behalf of our Lord, “This is my body which is given for you,” and to hold up the cup and say, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me.”

When one is a pastor he gets to hear people share how Christ has changed their lives as they communicate their profession of faith, and then to hear them express their commitment to Christ as they take their membership vows. He has the privilege quite often to pray with his brothers and sisters in Christ during their times of joy, and sadness, and during their days of youth, and old age.

And, yes, while there are those who make life difficult for the pastor, there are many, many more that are a great blessing to him. To hear from people in the congregation share that they pray for you every day is a great comfort and encouragement during the challenging times. There are those who share materially, emotionally, and spiritually with their pastor to make his life in ministry easier.

A pastor even has some flexibility in his schedule so that even though there are times when he is absent from the his family during the evening, it is possible (as I often mentioned to my son) to make those 5 o’clock games when some fathers are unable to be there because they can’t get off work in time.

When the time came for me to retire (earlier than I had hoped because of family needs) I was saddened because I miss greatly the work that has filled most of my adult life. Oh, I don’t miss long session meetings, or the slings and arrows that often fly in the direction of spiritual leaders, but I do miss the many blessings that accompany ministering to the people of God. For I learned early in my life that “This is a faithful saying: If a man desires the position of a bishop, he desires a good work.

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