Tuesday Hymns: “Here, O My Lord, I See Thee Face to Face

“Mine is the sin, but thine the righteousness;
Mine is the guilt, but thine the cleansing blood;
Here is my robe, my refuge, and my peace,
Thy blood, thy righteousness, O Lord my God.”
—Horatius Bonar

Horatius Bonar’s (December 19, 1808 – May 31, 1889) hymns invariably are filled with the truths of God’s marvelous grace, and, more often than not, touch on the active obedience of Christ on our behalf. Here, O My Lord, I See Thee Face to Face, our Tuesday Hymn for this week, is no exception. In it he has written of the assurance of forgiveness that one finds when he gathers with the church of God for worship. Bonar, a Scottish Presbyterian pastor, clearly understood that he could draw near to God in one way, and in one way only: through the finished work of Jesus Christ. This hymn is sung to the tune, MORECAMBE.

Here, O my Lord, I see thee face to face;
Here would I touch and handle things unseen,
Here grasp with firmer hand th’eternal grace,
And all my weariness upon thee lean.

Here would I feed upon the bread of God,
Here drink with thee the royal wine of heav’n;
Here would I lay aside each earthly load,
Here taste afresh the calm of sin forgiven.

This is the hour of banquet and of song;
This is the heav’nly table spread for me:
Here let me feast, and, feasting, still prolong
The brief, bright hour of fellowship with thee.

I have no help but thine, nor do I need
Another arm save thine to lean upon:
It is enough, my Lord, enough indeed;
My strength is in thy might, thy might alone.

Mine is the sin, but thine the righteousness;
Mine is the guilt, but thine the cleansing blood;
Here is my robe, my refuge, and my peace,
Thy blood, thy righteousness, O Lord my God.

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1 Comment

  1. rcottrill said,

    December 19, 2010 at 9:41 AM

    Thanks for posting Dr. Bonar’s great hymn. (Today is the 202nd anniversary of his birth.) The original hymn actually had 8 stanzas, not 5. And I love the following two that end his hymn:

    7) Too soon we rise; the symbols disappear;
    The feast, though not the love, is past and gone.
    The bread and wine remove; but Thou art here,
    Nearer than ever, still my Shield and Sun.

    8) Feast after feast thus comes and passes by;
    Yet, passing, points to the glad feast above,
    Giving sweet foretaste of the festal joy,
    The Lamb’s great bridal feast of bliss and love.

    If you enjoy reading about our hymns and their authors, I invite you to check out my daily blog on the subject, Wordwise Hymns. God bless.


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